See sparkling bioluminescence in Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica

May 27th, 2015

 

How to get to Puerto Jimenez from San José City.

May 26th, 2015

A tale of dreams and adventure: Beginning Playa Nicuesa Rainforest Lodge

May 25th, 2015

Playa Nicuesa Rainforest Lodge in Costa Rica
Guests staying at Playa Nicuesa Rainforest Lodge always ask: how did the Costa Rica eco-lodge get started?

The question is a reasonable one given Nicuesa Lodge’s isolated location in southern Costa Rica. It is a wild place of dense steamy rainforest and tranquil ocean, intensely populated by thousands of species of tropical wildlife. Playa Nicuesa is a little crescent-shaped beach and small bay on the pristine Golfo Dulce – “Sweet Gulf” – a critical habitat for migrating Pacific Humpback Whales, dolphins and hammerhead sharks. The region is a giant conservation area including the world-famous Corcovado National Park on the Osa Peninsula, the Piedras Blancas National Park and three other private reserves.

Playa Nicuesa on Golfo Dulce from the air
What keeps Playa Nicuesa Rainforest Lodge so unique and private is that the lodge is accessible only by boat. Almost directly across the gulf from the town of Puerto Jimenez, Nicuesa Lodge’s 165-acre private preserve is backed by rugged mountains and wild jungle of the Piedras Blancas National Park. There are no roads, and there is no development.

Dolphins in Golfo Dulce
So, how did a high-end eco-lodge come to be in this pure, remote place?
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7 Reasons your Body Wants you to Plan a Beach Trip

May 12th, 2015

7 reasons your body wants you to plan a beach trip

Sparkling bioluminescence in Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica

May 11th, 2015

Bioluminescence-on-shore

Walking along a tropical beach at night or sea kayaking after dark, especially the closer you get to the equator, often you will see sparkling lights in the water. It can seem as if the ocean is a liquid sky of blue stars. This is bioluminescence.

“Bioluminescence is the production and emission of light by a living organism as the result of a chemical reaction during which chemical energy is converted to light energy,” according to Science Daily.

Bioluminescent jellyfishBioluminescence occurs in a variety of marine animal species – bacteria, plankton, fish, jellyfish, squid and crustaceans. It also exists in some fungi, microorganisms and terrestrial invertebrates – think of fireflies and glow worms. Marine life depends on their bioluminescence for finding food, attracting mates and evading predators, according to Science Journal. Sometimes thousands of square miles of ocean shine with the light of bioluminescent bacteria or plankton. For instance, in Puerto Rico, there are three famous bioluminescent bays.

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